UIJRT » United International Journal for Research & Technology

Freedom of Trade Union Membership: An Appraisal of the 1992 Labour Code of Cameroon

Ginna Violet Yella
Keywords: Trade unions, Freedom, Workers, Labour Code.

Cite ➜

Yella, G.V., 2019. Freedom of Trade Union Membership: An Appraisal of the 1992 Labour Code of Cameroon. United International Journal for Research & Technology (UIJRT), 1(2), pp.18-25.

Abstract

Trade unions defend workers’ interest and act as agents of development. By virtue of the International Labour Organisation Convention No. 87 on Freedom of Association of Workers and Protection of the Right to Organise, workers are free to form and belong to trade unions of their choice. The Convention leaves the question whether the freedom to belong to a trade union also include the freedom not to belong to a trade union at the determination of national legislation. As a result, membership in a trade union is a call for concern in many countries. The main objective of this paper is to ascertain whether the 1992 Labour Code of Cameroon gives workers the freedom to join trade unions or not to join trade unions at all. We adopted a doctrinal methodology, which is a content analysis of primary and secondary data. Our findings reveal amongst others that the Labour Code gives workers the freedom to belong to trade unions or not to belong to trade unions. There is however a contradiction in the provisions of the Labour Code on sanctions for violation of freedom of trade union membership. This contradiction has led to the violation of freedom of trade union membership in Cameroon. As such, it is recommended that the Labour Code be amended and a clear-cut sanction be provided for the violation of freedom of trade union membership in Cameroon.

References

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  39. Ibid.
  40. “The Right to Work” adopted on 24th November 2005 by the UN Committee on Economic Social and Cultural Rights, referred to as Comment 18.
  41. Ibid.
  42. Ibid.
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  46. Ibid.
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  49. Ibid.
  50. Section 3 and 4 of the 1992 Labour Code.
  51. Law No. 96/18 of 18th January 1996 on the Constitution of Cameroon as amended in March 2008.
  52. Ibid.
  53. Section 4(2) of the Labour Code.
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  65. Ibid.
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  75. Ibid., section 4(1).
  76. Ibid., section 7(1).
  77. Ibid., section 7(2) (a) and (b).
  78. Ibid., section 10.
  79. Section 10 (1) of the Labour Code read together with Section 30 (1), (2) and (3) of the 2016 Penal Code of Cameroon.
  80. Ibid.
  81. Section 10 (2) of the Labour Code.
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  83. Ibid.
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  85. Ibid.
  86. Ibid.
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